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Harold Hall

Workshop Processes

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The fixture also permits the faceplate to be moved into the horizontal position for the workpiece and clamps to be added rather than on the lathe and being able to rotate it the part can be positioned as it would on the lathe except that gravity will be helping rather than hindering. This will be better understood by the photographs that follow.

 

Photographs 17 and 18 show two assemblies being set up in this way being the same ones as those set up on the lathe in photograph 1 and photograph 2,  I think the reader will appreciate how much easier this is in the horizontal position, especially so for more complex assemblies. Photograph 19 then shows one of the assemblies swung into the position for testing balance and the required weights having been added. Similarly, Photograph 20 shows the Keats assembly (photograph 12) having been balanced.

 

Finally, having balanced the assembly, either on, or remote from the lathe, do finally check that all the fixing screws, including those holding the weights are secure and that the assembly can be rotated by hand without any part fouling the machine, let machining commence, at last! It may have been a long process compared to using a chuck but unfortunately there are few short cuts available when using the faceplate.

 

Do give consideration  to making the Balancing Fixture .

Faceplate Balancing Fixture
Faceplate Balancing Fixture
Faceplate Balancing Fixture
Faceplate Balancing Fixture
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17

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18

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19

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20

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Drawings