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Harold Hall

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Metalworking

Workshop Projects

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Drawing

If the viewer would like to make his of her own T-slot cutter then see my pages regarding making one.

 

However, I should point out that the base has three slots closer together that will provide an option when choosing the method of securing the workpiece. These can be seen in Photograph 6.

 

Finishing

The next and final stage was adding slight chamfers to all the machined edges and clean up the edges of the cast in slots, finally, to paint the rear faces of the castings. With it then completed it should make a useful addition to the workshop's equipment.

Tilting angle plate, Adjustable angle plate
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19

Unfortunately, the smallest commercially available T-slot cutter is too big for the depth of the casting available so I used one I made for the largest CES rotary table when I made . The cutter is, 16mm diameter and the arms are 5mm thick. Subsequently, I realised that woodruff cutters are available about this size and are probably what CES had in mind when quoting the dimensions for the rotary table, that is if my memory is correct as I no longer have the drawings.

 

I made the central leg with a 10mm cutter. With the casting being approximately 18mm thick I would suggest a depth for the T-slot of 9mm. The combination of slots and T-slots is unconventional, Photograph 19, but consider that it will increase the usefulness of the item.