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Harold Hall

Metalworking

Workshop Set Ups

Faceplate Setups Harold Hall

Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using
Lathe Faceplate using

All pictures can be clicked on to provide a larger view

Lathe Faceplate, using adhesive to hold workpiece.
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For most workshop owners, using the faceplate will be amongst the most feared tasks, for many, the most feared. These pictures show just a small range of setups, the possible number being very large, much more than using the lathe’s chucks The faceplate, Photo 1, has a facility for adding a central spigot which is used as a reference for locating parts accurately. In this case it is an angle plate on which a casting  is  to be fitted for boring, Photo 2. LINK

 

Photo 3 shows a lathe’s centre  being used as a reference to position a fence for positioning a bearing block, Photo 4. The fence ensures subsequent blocks are bored at exactly the same height. The setup uses faceplate dogs which enable  sideways adjustment to set the bore central. LINK

 

Again a centre is being used as a reference, this time to set two fences,Photo 5. The spacer  is equal to the centre’s diameter, ensuring the fences are parallel and concentric with the lathe’s spindle. Photo 6 shows they are being used to position a round workpiece which is being bored through its centre. Note the longer stud, photograph 5, is being used to clamp the workpiece. LINK

 

Photo 7 shows a soleplate for a steam engine being bored and as there was insufficient room for an angle plate to support it. a block of steel was machined as an alternative. The bar on the faceplate is there just to help balance the assembly. LINK

 

A Con Rod, Photo 8, having been centre punched, is being positioned on a locating plate using the lathes tailstock centre. It is held there temporarily using double adhesive  until it is clamped and bored as seen in Photo 9. LINK

 

 

If a piece of metal is too large for the lathe’s chucks then a Keats Angle Plate is an alternative, Photo 10. Unfortunately, getting it to run true on the lathe can be quite difficult as gravity will not be helping. Photo 11 shows it horizontal on my Faceplate Balancing Fixture which permits the workpiece to be positioned and then  moved to the  vertical position for  balancing.  LINK

 

Machining a largish flywheel is a typical task for a faceplate, at least initially, Photo 12. It may then benefit from being lightly machined whilst mounted on a stub mandrel ensuring that it runs true relative to its bore. LINK

 

If a centre punch mark, or a centre drilled impression, is made on the workpiece, then this can be centred onto the faceplate using a centre finder, Photo 13. Where a precise result is not required the the faceplate can be rotated manually and adjustments made to the workpiece until the centre finder appears stationary. For a precise result a dial test indicator can be used as seen in the photograph. LINK

 

Photo 14. A Tee slotted faceplate has advantages over a normal slotted plate, typically.

1.Only one hand is needed to secure the workpiece the other hand is then free to hold and position it during the process.**

2. Fixing studs or screws can be positioned nearer the edge.

3. Normal faceplates can bend when the workpiece is  clamped, but with the heavier construction of the tee slotted plate this will be much less.

4. The plates heavier weight minimises the effect of any out of balance that results from the position of the workpiece and its clamps.

** Of course, tee nuts can be used with a normal plate but prevents the fixing being at either the outer or inner end of the slot.

The faceplate is actually the base for my Four Jaw Chuck Alternative.       LINK

 

See all my pages on  Using the Faceplate

Lathe Faceplate using
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13

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14

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15

The faceplate in photo 15 has a plain face and the workpiece is secured using adhesive. In the example, thin film double adhesive is being used and for extra security strips of plastic are placed around the four sides. The method worked well and the plastic strips were almost certainly unnecessary. It is also possible to use two part resin adhesive, then, after machining the part, heating up the assembly which will release the bond.   LINK

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