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Harold Hall

Metalworking

Workshop Set Ups

Drilling Jigs,  Setups.       Harold Hall

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Drilling Jig, using
Drilling Jig, using
Drilling Jig, using
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 1

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 2

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 3

Drilling Jig
Drilling Jig, using
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Drilling Jig
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Part drilled using a drilling jig
Part drilled using a drilling jig
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Drilling Jig, using
Part drilled using a drilling jig
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11

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12

All pictures can be clicked on to provide a larger view

Using a drilling jig can be for one of a number of reasons, typically if access to the area to be drilled is limited making it difficult to mark out the position of the hole to be drilled. Photos 1 and 2 being examples where a simple drill bush made the task easy. The task in photograph 2 also required  the hole being drilled to line up with a hole in the final assembly.

 

Close examination of Photo 3 shows that recesses have been made on the jig, rather like a round tee nut. The recesses sit between the channel in the workpiece ensuring that the hole drilled is central. The diameter was chosen so that if it were aligned with the edge of the workpiece the hole will be the correct distance from its edge. The larger diameter also ensures that there is more for the clamp to grip. The holes were for the fixings for the arms on fixed and travelling steadies, the jig therefore having been used five times. LINK

 

Another purpose is where holes in two or more part have holes that must line up in the final assembly. Photo 4 shows a jig for achieving this in the case of a cylinder and end covers. Photo 5 shows the end of the cylinder being drilled with the jig positioned and secured by using the larger part in photograph 4. Photo 6 shows it being used for one of the end covers and Photo 7 the end result. LINK

 

A third example is where a number of identical parts have to be made and a jig will speed up the task. However, for the parts in Photo 8 (12 being made) there is an additional reason. Even a slight error in the position of a hole to the edges, or to the end, would be very apparent on something so narrow and  not visually acceptable in the final assembly, Photo 9.

 

The jig for these is seen in Photo 10 and was made using the X and Y dials on the milling machine to accurately position the 9 holes required. The task of drilling the 12 parts was then very easy.

 

Photo 11 shows a very special jig. In this case the component being made (the round item in the photograph)required a partial thread on its outer edge. The hole was therefore drilled as the photograph shows and then tapped.

 

The component can be seen in Photo 12 but after further operations had been carried out. The partial thread in the workpiece and the jig can be clearly seen in the larger picture. LINK  

Drilling Jig, using
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